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News from FABBS

Demonstrating Research on Cognitive Functioning in Virtual Reality to Lawmakers

September 25, 2019

At the Coalition for Health Funding Public Health Fair, FABBS partnered with our member society, the American Psychological Association (APA), to showcase the innovative work of two University of Iowa researchers. Dr. Jodie Plumert, a psychologist, in collaboration with Dr. Joseph Kearney, a computer scientist, use virtual reality to study child pedestrian and bike safety – risk free.

Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-CA) put on the virtual reality headset,

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Getting the Gist Requires Expertise

August 21, 2019

When the trees block the view of the forest, the consequences can be dire.  A recent paper in Policy Insights in the Behavioral and Brain Sciences looks at one component of the 2002 decision to invade Iraq as an example where policy makers had the details but not the context needed to make an informed decision on whether to invade. The paper also demonstrates how adherence to a concept known as Fuzzy Trace Theory could make sure future decisions are well advised and

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Reading and Math, Better Together

June 13, 2019

We
get it: one of the best ways to help children succeed in school and in life is
to read to them.  

But math? Not so much, with some parents unaware of the importance of math in the early years and teachers by and large spending twice as much time on reading than on math, according to a new paper in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences.

The paper, “Mathematics and Reading Develop Together in Young Children: Practical and Policy

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Is Social Science Really Experiencing a Crisis?

April 25, 2019

Mainstream media frequently cover findings from
psychological research, but until recently, the field itself was rarely the
subject of intense public scrutiny. That has changed in recent years amid a
so-called “replication crisis” – a pattern of researchers publishing findings
that turn out to be hard for others to confirm. This pattern is actually not
new, and calling it a crisis may be overblown, according to psychologists Joseph Lee Rodgers and Patrick Shrout.

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