News

News from FABBS

FABBS reports on items of interest to many communities – scientists, policymakers, and the public. In our news, you will see updates on science funding and policy, articles that translate research for policy, and descriptions of the research contributions of scientists at all stages of their research careers.

Biden Signs Dozens of EOs in First Weeks as President

February 3, 2021

Since taking office on January 20th, President Biden has issued dozens of Executive Orders (EOs) on a wide range of topics — COVID-19, climate change, criminal detention agencies, to name a few — many revoking EOs issued by the former administration. The full list is on The White House site and in the Federal Registry. Below are several EOs particularly relevant to FABBS members.

President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) – This EO established

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FABBS Endorses Science and Technology Action Plan

February 3, 2021

The Science & Technology Action Committee is a nonpartisan coalition of non-profit, academic, foundation, and corporate leaders working to dramatically strengthen the U.S. science and technology infrastructure. The Committee released a three-step action plan to accomplish this goal. FABBS has endorsed it.

The three bold actions to advance science and technology in the United States include:

S&T Leadership – Elevate the director of the Office of Science and

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Data Sharing Seminar Series for Societies

FABBS is joining forces with several other organizations to provide societies and their journals with information and resources to help their communities be more knowledgeable and prepared to share data (and software) in a way that is relevant and meaningful for each discipline.

This is a 12-month series.

Next upcoming seminar: 5 February 2021, 10 – 11 am ET (15:00 UTC)

Title: Data Sharing and Citation: How Societies Can Make a Difference

Speakers:

Shelley Stall, American

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Biased? Probably.

January 22, 2021

Ever left an Airbnb without waving a friendly good-bye to the hosts?  If you’re white, probably no big deal.  If you’re Black, well the hosts may have thought you were trying to hide something.

New research in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences uses this scenario and others as examples of implicit bias based on a person’s “category,” such as race or gender.

Often people are not aware their impressions of someone are rooted in

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