News

News from FABBS

FABBS reports on items of interest to many communities – scientists, policymakers, and the public. In our news, you will see updates on science funding and policy, articles that translate research for policy, and descriptions of the research contributions of scientists at all stages of their research careers.

NSB Releases Report on the State of U.S. Science

January 29, 2020

On January 15, the National Science Board released a new and improved version of previous reports –  The State of U.S. Science and Engineering. A briefing on Capitol Hill included information from chapters on science and math education, higher education, the technical workforce, and scientific publications. NSF will release four more chapters in the coming months —reporting global spending patterns, academic research, trade and industry, knowledge transfer, and

read more

Q&A with New FABBS Board President, Roxane Cohen Silver

January 15, 2020

FABBS welcomes Roxane Cohen Silver, University of California, Irvine, as she steps into the role of FABBS President for a two-year term.

What inspired you to become President of the FABBS board?

My academic area of expertise is on the psychological, physical, and social impact of traumatic life experiences, such as natural disasters, mass violence events, and other community traumas. Over the years, I have been struck by the fact that public leaders and decision

read more

Open Access and “Zero Embargo” Rumors

January 15, 2020

In early December, the science community started hearing rumors about an Executive Order (EO) that would require all federally-funded research to be available to the public at the time of publishing in place of the 12-month post-publication embargo period outlined by the 2013 “Holdren memo”. These rumors suggested that the EO would be effective immediately and was coming from somewhere other than the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). It has since been

read more

Using Computers Not Only to Write, but to Learn How

January 15, 2020

Today’s teen-agers may be Snapchat savvy, but many
of these same students are unskilled in using computers to write well, according
to new research in Policy Insights from
the Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 

Teachers, likewise, are not getting the training they need to teach students to use digital technologies to write—a key skill for success in college and in an increasing number of career fields, according to “Technology as a Lever for Adolescent

read more