News

News from FABBS

FABBS reports on items of interest to many communities – scientists, policymakers, and the public. In our news, you will see updates on science funding and policy, articles that translate research for policy, and descriptions of the research contributions of scientists at all stages of their research careers.

FABBS Endorses Legislation to Support Early Career Scholars and Provide Research Relief During COVID and Calls for Research on Systemic Racism in Academia

September 10, 2020

On Wednesday, September 9, the Research and Technology Subcommittee of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology (HSST) held a hearing on the ‘Impact of the COVID-19 Crisis on University Research’. Chaired by Rep. Haley Stevens (D-MI) and Ranking Member Jim Baird (R-IN), the hearing featured four university representatives, including a PhD student, articulating the consequences of COVID-19 on innovation, researchers, and students. Members also discussed two

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FABBS Selected for Day One Policy Accelerator Cohort

September 10, 2020

FABBS is excited to announce our participation in the second Day One Accelerator Cohort—a platform to democratize science, tech, and innovation policy development. The goal of the Day One Project is to identify 100 actionable ideas for the first day of the next Presidential term. As part of this cohort, FABBS will be participating with 14 other teams from different corners of the S&T community to develop a policy proposal over 45 days. FABBS’ selected policy

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Focusing on Numbers Ignores Sources of Gender Bias

September 10, 2020

In a new paper on testing and gender bias published in the FABBS journal, Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, author Joseph R. Cimpian quotes an elementary school teacher:

            “These are my students’ standardized test scores, and there are absolutely no gender differences. See, the girls can do just as well as the boys if they work hard enough.”

In “Why Focusing on Test

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How Falsehoods Start to Sound Like Facts

July 30, 2020

You need a microscope to view the stars.

You need a microscope to view the stars.

Believe me yet?  Vanderbilt University psychologist Lisa K. Fazio says hearing a statement — even “extreme falsehoods that you definitely should know are false” — more than once increases the likelihood people will believe it.

“Even statements Americans as a whole tend to know are false; it didn’t matter,” said Fazio, director of Vanderbilt’s Building Knowledge Lab.

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