News

News from FABBS

FABBS reports on items of interest to many communities – scientists, policymakers, and the public. In our news, you will see updates on science funding and policy, articles that translate research for policy, and descriptions of the research contributions of scientists at all stages of their research careers.

Data Sharing Seminar Series for Societies

FABBS is joining forces with several other organizations to provide societies and their journals with information and resources to help their communities be more knowledgeable and prepared to share data (and software) in a way that is relevant and meaningful for each discipline.

This is a 12-month series.

These seminars are monthly through January 2022 held on the first Friday of each month at 10am ET (14:00 UTC). There will be 2-3 speakers with ~30 minutes of Q&A and discussion

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Biased? Probably.

January 22, 2021

Ever left an Airbnb without waving a friendly good-bye to the hosts?  If you’re white, probably no big deal.  If you’re Black, well the hosts may have thought you were trying to hide something.

New research in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences uses this scenario and others as examples of implicit bias based on a person’s “category,” such as race or gender.

Often people are not aware their impressions of someone are rooted in

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Q&A with David Johnson, Former Executive Director

January 21, 2021

As we commemorate 40 years of the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences (FABBS), we have invited former FABBS Executive Directors to reflect on their time in the role.

In this Q&A, we spoke with David Johnson, who served as Executive Director from 1988-2000, with insights on the growth of behavioral and social science at federal agencies over time.

During your tenure, federal agencies took significant steps to advance the behavioral and

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Database of Police Outcomes May Be First Step to Reduce Racial Bias

January 21, 2021

Not only are black people more likely than white people to be stopped by police, but new research in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences documents that the darker you are, the more likely you are to be shot.

Conversely white people with very white skin are less likely to have force used against them.  “Whiteness serve(s) as a protective factor,” Kimberly Barsamian Kahn and Karin D. Martin explain in “The Social Psychology of Racially Biased

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