News

News from FABBS

FABBS reports on items of interest to many communities – scientists, policymakers, and the public. In our news, you will see updates on science funding and policy, articles that translate research for policy, and descriptions of the research contributions of scientists at all stages of their research careers.

FABBS and Member Societies Meet with New NIMH Director

Scientists attending the FABBS Council of Representatives Annual Meeting were invited to participate in a meeting with the new National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Director, Dr. Joshua Gordon. Gordon, a psychiatrist and neuroscientist, joined NIH on September 12, 2016. Soon after taking the reins at NIMH, Gordon told Nature, “I won’t be doing anything radical [in the first year in office]. I am just going to listen to and learn from all the stakeholders—the scientific community, the

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Science Bill Passes as the 114th Congress Ends

Just as the 114th Congress ended its second session, the Senate and House champions of a bill to provide direction for programs at the National Science Foundation (NSF), White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and other federal science agencies, got the legislation across the finish line. The final bill reflected common ground between House and Senate science committee leaders. Senator John Thine (R-SD), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation,

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FABBS Honors Michael Lewis

Michael Lewis is University Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, and Director of the Institute for the Study of Child Development at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He is also Professor of Psychology, Education, Biomedical Engineering, and Social Work at Rutgers University. In addition he serves on the Executive Committee of the Cognitive Science Center and is an Associate of the Center for Mathematics, Science and Computer Education.

He has written and edited

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To Make Every Child a Reader, Teach Them All Differently

It’s hard to believe that questions about how children learn to read could cause a war, but in the 1970’s and 80’s, that’s exactly what happened. During the “reading wars,” proponents of the phonics approach believed beginning readers needed to focus on sounding out letters and words, while whole language advocates argued for immersing children in interesting texts and focusing on meaning, with the faith that reading specific words would follow. That debate has long been settled

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