News

News from FABBS

FABBS reports on items of interest to many communities – scientists, policymakers, and the public. In our news, you will see updates on science funding and policy, articles that translate research for policy, and descriptions of the research contributions of scientists at all stages of their research careers.

No Single Solution for Bullying

Media reports of bullying and its consequences have become distressingly common, especially for parents of children and teens. A spate of high profile cases that ended in suicide or violence helped fuel a national movement for legislation to define and deal with bullying. All 50 states now have laws designed to prevent and address bullying in schools, but those laws vary widely and their impact isn’t clear. What is clear is that laws alone can’t stop bullying, because it’s a complex

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Looking Beyond Treatment to Understand Relapse

Treatment for problematic behaviors like drug and alcohol addiction, self-injury, and childhood aggression costs individuals and society millions of dollars a year. Well-designed treatments often work in the short term, but relapse is common. Understanding the reasons why is critical, because when people take up their old bad habits, it causes distress for patients, families, and community members. But one significant factor is rarely considered by clinicians, because it isn’t about the

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When Seasons Change, We Do, Too

When Tyler Stevenson was a child, he was fascinated by the seasonal rhythms of his native Ontario, amazed that some animals knew when to leave for the winter while others stayed and adapted in order to survive. Little did he know that fascination would turn into a career that would advance understanding of how the environment shapes human, animal, and plant behavior. Stevenson’s research has shown that seasons affect far more than whether birds (and people) go south for the winter. Seasons

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Spotting Early Warning Signs of Psychosis

Schizophrenia, a debilitating disorder characterized by hallucinations, intrusive thoughts, and illogical behaviors, affects about 1% of the population. That might sound like a small number, but to psychologist Vijay Mittal, it isn’t small at all – and neither are its consequences. “In a room of 100 people, one is likely to have schizophrenia and several more are related to someone with the disorder,” Mittal points out. “We don’t talk about it very often, but it is so detrimental to

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